The Cost of Diabetes.

This is one of several posts I will soon be posting on Facebook in an effort to raise diabetes awareness and in my effort to campaign for donations for JDRF. This post will be tweaked a bit, less political and more directed at finding a cure.

If someone with Type 1 Diabetes didn’t have health insurance, they would have to pay, per month:

Insulin: 91.57/bottle x 4 bottles/month = $400 (with tax)

Infusion Sets:  $135/box x 4 boxes/month =  $600 (with tax and shipping)

-Cartridges:  36.50/box x 4 boxes/month = $200 (with tax and shipping)

Test Strips: 1.25/test strip x 5 tests/day x30 days/month = $200/month (with tax)

Control Solution:  (used to make sure glucose monitors are working properly) $13.99/month plus tax

Sensors:  (used with Continuous Glucose Monitoring technology) $323.50/month plus shipping

Alcohol Wipes:  2.50/box x2 boxes/month = $5.00

Lancets: 1 box/month @15.99 plus tax

IV Prep (used to keep infusion sets from disconnecting): $13.00/box one per month

IV 3000 (Used to keep sensors and infusion sets from being knocked off) : $65 per 100, aprox. $21 per month

Glucose Tabs: (Used to treat low blood sugar) 5.99/bottle, 2-3 bottles a month = $15

Keytostiks: (used to test for ketones in the urine) (one every six months) $2.00/month (12.00/bottle)

-Glucagon: (used to revive someone who passes out from low blood sugar)(one every six months) $20/month (120 per box)

Grand Total:

$1830/month

$21,960/year

Things replaced every 4 years or so:

Glucose Meter:  $60

Insulin Pump: $6000-$8000

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System – $1000

Total= $9,060 divided by 4= 2,265/year

Total with medical devices: $24,225/year

NOW THE CHEAP WAY: replace infusion sets and cartridges with syringes:

Subtract 1000/month and add 50/month for syringes=

880/month

AND add another 200/month for replacing extra testing for using sensors:

1080/month

12,960/year (I’ve never even made this much in one year).

BUT add complications later because control is not as good on shots as it is using a pump and a CGMS

Hospital bills = $$$$$$$$

Even WITH insurance, it costs a co-pay of $10-50 /month for EACH prescription. Some things are not prescriptions and still are full price, such as IV Prep, IV 3000, and glucose tabs.

Most insurance companies only cover a portion of the cost of a pump or a CGMS. Often times patients must meet high deductibles and wind up paying over 1000 for these items. I feel as though these items should NOT be seen as a “luxury” because of the scientific evidence of tighter control when using them.

Often times, insurance companies deny people with “diabetes” as a pre-existing condition because it is seen as “preventable.”  Type 1 is not preventable. It is an auto-immune disease that attacks the body’s insulin-producing cells for an unknown reason. Basically, people with Type 1’s body says, “I don’t like you, beta cells” and destroys them, leaving them unable to do their job of producing insulin to process the body’s food intake.

It’s just something to think about.

If someone with Type 1 Diabetes didn’t have health insurance, they would have to pay, per month:

Insulin: 91.57/bottle x 4 bottles/month = $400 (with tax)

Infusion Sets:  $135/box x 4 boxes/month =  $600 (with tax and shipping)

-Cartridges:  36.50/box x 4 boxes/month = $200 (with tax and shipping)

Test Strips: 1.25/test strip x 5 tests/day x30 days/month = $200/month (with tax)

Control Solution:  (used to make sure glucose monitors are working properly) $13.99/month plus tax

Sensors:  (used with Continuous Glucose Monitoring technology) $323.50/month plus shipping

Alcohol Wipes:  2.50/box x2 boxes/month = $5.00

Lancets: 1 box/month @15.99 plus tax

IV Prep (used to keep infusion sets from disconnecting): $13.00/box one per month

IV 3000 (Used to keep sensors and infusion sets from being knocked off) : $65 per 100, aprox. $21 per month

Glucose Tabs: (Used to treat low blood sugar) 5.99/bottle, 2-3 bottles a month = $15

Keytostiks: (used to test for ketones in the urine) (one every six months) $2.00/month (12.00/bottle)

-Glucagon: (used to revive someone who passes out from low blood sugar)(one every six months) $20/month (120 per box)

Grand Total:

$1830/month

$21,960/year

Things replaced every 4 years or so:

Glucose Meter:  $60

Insulin Pump: $6000-$8000

Continuous Glucose Monitoring System – $1000

Total= $9,060 divided by 4= 2,265/year

Total with medical devices: $24,225/year

NOW THE CHEAP WAY: replace infusion sets and cartridges with syringes:

Subtract 1000/month and add 50/month for syringes=

880/month

AND add another 200/month for replacing extra testing for using sensors:

1080/month

12,960/year (I’ve never even made this much in one year).

BUT add complications later because control is not as good on shots as it is using a pump and a CGMS

Hospital bills = $$$$$$$$

Even WITH insurance, it costs a co-pay of $10-50 /month for EACH prescription. Some things are not prescriptions and still are full price, such as IV Prep, IV 3000, and glucose tabs.

Most insurance companies only cover a portion of the cost of a pump or a CGMS. Often times patients must meet high deductibles and wind up paying over 1000 for these items. I feel as though these items should NOT be seen as a “luxury” because of the scientific evidence of tighter control when using them.

Often times, insurance companies deny people with “diabetes” as a pre-existing condition because it is seen as “preventable.”  Type 1 is not preventable. It is an auto-immune disease that attacks the body’s insulin-producing cells for an unknown reason. Basically, people with Type 1’s body says, “I don’t like you, beta cells” and destroys them, leaving them unable to do their job of producing insulin to process the body’s food intake.

It’s just something to think about.

The prices were estimated using the Animas Corporation website and the American Diabetes Wholesale website (using the retail price and not the wholesale price, because it estimates the price a typical patient would pay in a drugstore). Prices for sensors were based on this patient’s cost before insurance when ordering sensors from the Dexcom corporation.  All numbers are estimates and not actual figures.

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One thought on “The Cost of Diabetes.

  1. binishew

    Great post!! I was actually denied by Aetna because of my diabetes. It would have saved me 170 dollars a paycheck (I get paid twice a month). I pay almost 200 dollars a paycheck for my current insurance (blue cross/blue shield), so I was very disappointing that I wasn’t able to switch over.

    It is crazy how much money goes into this disease. But, I would take the cost of tighter control over the cost of treating the complications any day!!

    Reply

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